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How much does a Super Bowl 2024 TV commercial cost? What brands have bought air time for Sunday?

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On Sunday, 11 February the San Francisco 49ers will take on the Kansas City Chiefs in a battle to be crowned the best team in NFL. But, of course, that on-field matchup is just one part of the day-long extravaganza known as Super Bowl Sunday.

In the United States alone more than 110 million people are expected to tune in for Super Bowl LVIII, making it the most coveted piece of advertising real estate on television. Super Bowl adverts are famously pricey, but exactly how much does a slot for the 2024 edition cost?

CNN report that a 30-second ad in 2024 will cost between $6.5 million and $7 million. Most advertisers opt for a more extensive minute-long advert for Super Bowl Sunday, meaning that the cost of their 60-second production will be $13 million to $14 million.

Despite that lofty price tag, all advertising slots for the three-hour sporting spectacle sold out long before the 49ers and the Chiefs had booked their tickets to Las Vegas.

Which brands have Super Bowl adverts?

Unsurprisingly, with such a massive financial outlay required, the majority of Super Bowl advertising space is bought up by big-name, established brands. This year Budweiser, State Farm Insurance, Oreo, BMW and DoorDash have all confirmed that they will be airing commercials during the Game.

Beer adverts have become a staple of Super Bowl commercials and Michelob Ultra has already attracted attention ahead of the big day. They have enlisted soccer star Lionel Messi to take part in their 2024 advert, appearing alongside Dan Marino and Jason Sudeikis, in-character as hapless coach Ted Lasso.

The advert is not only a marketing boon for Michelob, but it also represents a major commercial step for Messi. The 36-year-old signed for MLS side Inter Miami last summer and will now appear in a Super Bowl advert for the first time.

So what will we not see advertised at Super Bowl LVIII? Well, Paul Hardart, a clinical professor of marketing for New York University’s Stern School of Business, believes that high-end technologies and Cryptocurrency adverts will be at a minimum this year, as brands look to focus on more “traditional products”.

“Given the current global uncertainties, including geopolitical conflicts and a polarized political climate, it appears that advertisers are leaning toward feel-good advertisements that are more focused on fun, humor and entertainment — aligning with the Super Bowl’s uplifting spirit,” he told CNN.

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